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February 25, 2019

Donald Trump – Negotiator or Salesperson?


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3 Secrets about Negotiation Skills You Probably Don’t Know (And The Difference Between Salespeople and Negotiators)


If there’s one consistent thing about Donald Trump, it’s that everybody has an opinion about him.


But love him or hate him, there’s one thing that you can’t deny. Trump has spent his life doing deals - financial, political and personal.


It appears that Trump enters every negotiation with an agenda. He knows what he wants to achieve and he has a plan to get it. In fact, he chases his agenda relentlessly until he finally gets what he wants.


He’s not looking to sell you anything. Instead, he’s negotiating to achieve his aims.


That’s something that many people don’t understand. Selling and negotiating are not the same thing. Here are the reasons why.


The Differences Between Selling and Negotiating


The differences between salespeople and negotiators come to the fore during a negotiation.


More often than not, the salesperson ends up on the losing end. That’s because they don’t understand the key differences between a negotiation and the setting they’re more familiar with.


Difference #1 – Negotiators Have Principles


A salesperson is usually only focused on achieving a sale. That means their discussions almost always come down to one thing – price.


The salesperson wants the sale and the customer wants the best price.
If the customer isn’t sold on the price, the discussion ends.


However, negotiations have principles. Each participant goes in understanding that they want to achieve something. That means they need to set the principles of what the deal needs to be.


A good negotiator sets principles and values that benefit both parties. They’re firm on their principles in terms of what they need from the deal. However, they also know that they need to create a deal that’s fair for both parties.

Difference #2 – Negotiators See Things From All Perspectives


Again, this comes back to the singular focus of a salesperson. They’re so focused on getting a sale that they’re not seeing the situation from all perspectives. That means they can’t think creatively in order to strike a deal.


This almost always leads to them just lowering the price to get a better deal.


Negotiators can see the deal from every possible perspective. They’re looking to satisfy the other party with more than just the product. For example, there’s an interesting phenomenon in negotiating. Often, the other party feels more satisfied if you ask for more from them. That’s because you’re asking for a deeper commitment, which makes them feel more valued.


A salesperson often asks for less, which makes both them and the deal they’re striking less valuable.


Difference #3 – Negotiators Understand All of the Issues


In sales, you only need to know two things:
* The other party has a pain point.
* The other party has the ability to buy.


Once a salesperson establishes those two things, they jump straight into trying to make a deal. They have something to sell and they’re trying to convince the other party that they can solve their problem.


As mentioned, negotiators see the deal from an array of angles. They understand they’re trying to get more out of it than a sale. And they also know that the other party may have several issues that they need to confront. This understanding allows them to come up with more creative solutions, even when price is a sticking point.


What Do Negotiators Do Differently?
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An Expert Negotiator Knows Their Exit


The regular salesperson operates out of need.
They need to achieve the sale, which means they’re going to cling on even when things don’t turn out well for them.


An expert negotiator doesn’t enter a negotiation with that sense of need. At no point will they allow themselves to appear desperate. They know exactly what they’re bringing to the table and how they will create value for the other party.


As Trump puts it: “The worst thing you can possibly do in a deal is seem desperate to make it. That makes the other guy smell blood, and then you're dead.”


The negotiator also knows exactly what they require of the other party if they’re to create value for them.


This means they have an exit point. If the other party won’t provide what they want out of the deal, an expert negotiator has the emotional strength to walk away.


This proves much more effective than the desperate acts of the salesperson. By walking away, the negotiator is telling the other party that they know just how much value they offer. They are also telling them that they know somebody else will give them what they want to get that value.


When they exit a deal, they often create a situation where the other party wants back in to the point where they offer what the negotiator wanted all along.


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The Negotiator Negotiates on Multiple Issues


As mentioned, salespeople often zero in on price as the one area they’ll focus on in a negotiation. However, most people consider more than just the price when they’re looking to strike a deal.


The negotiator understands that, which is why you’ll rarely catch them negotiating on a single issue. That’s haggling instead of negotiating.


The negotiator knows that the other party will challenge them on multiple levels, from quality and performance through to the support they offer. If they experience push back in regards to price, they can immediately jump to one of these other levels to show that the value they offer is worth the price.


The Negotiator Can Handle the Choking Point
Eventually, the deal will hit a tipping point.


That’s when you’re most likely to choke. Your mind starts to panic as you look for a way to close the deal.


This is an emotion and you need to learn how to manage it before you can become a great negotiator.  Expert negotiators handle the choking point better than most people.  They are able to remain calm during negotiations, where others might panic.


The Final Word


Expert negotiators have the emotional resilience needed to handle the pressure of the situation.


They always set their principles before negotiating and know what they want, what they offer, and when they’ll walk away. They’re never desperate and are able to negotiate on multiple levels.
So do you think Donald Trump is a negotiator or a salesperson?


Either way, watching how high profile deal makers use, or don’t use, these  approaches can help  transform you from a salesperson into a negotiator.


Frontier Performance can help you. We’re offering complimentary training to selected prospects. Just head to our website to find out if you qualify.

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April 07, 2016

“DO YOU KNOW WHAT YOU WANT TO DO?”

Not an easy answer to come up with for many people.

How do you find out what you really want to do? What is the one thing you want to do that you enjoy the most, have fun doing and would perhaps do it even if you didn’t get paid for it?

Many people go through life without really figuring this out and they kind of accept that this is the way for most people. Therefore they usually live unfulfilled.

There are two main components to figuring out what you want to do:



  1. Does it make you happy when you do it?

  2. Are you consumed by it?


The key question is whose responsibility is it to figure this out?

Often the “THING” you love, finds you. I have seen this with many people. Does luck have anything to do with this? YES, absolutely. People who know exactly what they want, and find it, are truly blessed. You will often find such people at the forefront in their profession because they have been doing it for 15 to 20 years and now are masters. Think of the sports stars who have been practicing their sport since they were 4-7 years old or a musician who is a child prodigy.

As children we need guidance; children don’t actually know what they are good at. I know with my 14 year old son we tried several sports before he found his calling, all by accident. At the age of 7 he went to a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu class and from there it became an obsession with him. There are significant benefits for children who find a sport that they love at an early stage. From discipline, to learning to take instruction, to developing a competitive spirit and problem solving. Whose responsibility is it to guide the child? The parents’!

So if your parents did not have the knowledge to help you or at that situation in life it was difficult, what can you do now?

I find the ideal way to think about this is to reflect and go back into your childhood and think about all the things you did that you liked and didn’t like and then ask the question "WHY?". Write the two sets of answers down and then reflect on them, visualise these memories. This is an exercise that you want to spend time on. After all, you are trying to find out what you really want to do, so give this the appropriate time to reflect and gather your thoughts. Some of you may get a quick answer while others may require more work on this. There is no easy answer to this question. The only suggestion I have for you is that you have to work on this and if you do this exercise honestly, it has the potential to change your life.

From my perspective, I had a burning desire to help sales people because of the pain I went through to get really good at what I do. I got tired of well-meaning sales managers sending me to sales courses that after a while were just spitting out the same message. They weren’t giving me the answers I needed to grow and improve and I was hungry for the knowledge, so I took it upon myself; it was a compulsion to find out what made me tick and what made others tick and how I could get people to say yes to me more often. I wanted answers.

Back to you - when you think about what you want to do and can be happy doing, you also want to examine the reality of your situation (I don’t know what stage in life you are at). Sometimes what we want to do is not possible to do immediately but that doesn’t mean you have to give up on it. It just means you have to make it happen gradually; Rome wasn’t built in a day. The reality of life is it is not always possible to change one’s situation quickly. You have to plan, keep on asking the key question – “will it make me happy if I did that?”

Think about how you build a house - one brick at a time. That is how you build the life you consider your ‘ideal’ life. From personal experience I know it is worthwhile to spend time on this, the benefits far outweigh the accepting, the status quo.
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September 03, 2015

WHEN DO YOU MOVE ON?

The funny thing is, the people who need to change the most aren’t open to it; often they don’t even know it and seem to live in a bubble. I am sure you have encountered many people who are like this. I certainly have! …and they can be a challenge to work with. Can you get this person to open themselves up to thinking in a new way or even to listen to you?

What you can do is, first learn to spot this person, then make a decision to either persist or move on. So, what are the signs that allow you as the sales person or manager, to pick or read these signals?

The key skill is tuning your listening skills to hearing what they aren’t saying.

Some of the signs are:

  • They are not willing to listen to you at all

  • They are unreasonable

  • Most of their sentences start with an “I”

  • They can’t seem to back up what they are talking about with facts and usually have no in-depth knowledge of what is actually going on with the team or themselves or their business

  • They often make irrational decisions that are primarily very emotional


You can get fairly quick at picking this up based upon daily experiences.

In my experience, if the selling cycle is longer than usual or they don’t take up an offer that virtually every other person has, you know what you’re dealing with. At this stage I have often decided to not spend any more time with these people as they are hard work and often have unrealistic expectations. You can often regret working with them. At some stage you have to pick up stumps and go to another game.

The choice is always yours and yours alone.
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July 31, 2015

WARRIOR OR STRATEGIST?

In NYC today I had the good fortune to meet Luke Rockhold the #1 ranked UFC fighter in the middleweight (185 lbs) division who is a contender for the title against the world champion Chris Weidman.

My 13 year old son is a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu fighter champion and boxer. I spoke with Luke about my son's aspirations to eventually compete in MMA, and my concerns about head trauma. He said something quite profound "there are two types of fighters - the Warrior or the Strategist".

The Warrior goes out there and although he/she fight with their heart, they are not concerned with applying strategy.

The Strategist on the other hand, fights using their head. He said to me, "I don't go into a fight to get hit; as you see in my fights, I hardly ever get hit".  Consequently, a strategist will more likely win against the warrior.

This made me think about the people I train in sales. Some people really think about what they are learning and the deep strategy behind it; they apply the knowledge and techniques whereas some others, although well meaning, are still selling like 'warriors'; they are still not evolving and unable to get to the next level. In life, whether it's fighting in the UFC for a world title or meeting your sales targets, it requires a continual focus on knowledge acquisition and application of it.

I was pleasantly surprised by how nice Luke was and forthcoming with his knowledge, his willingness to engage with my son and in fact spar with him. This has changed my mind about how fighters at the top think and behave. It's not just brute force, they are constantly thinking, changing, evolving.

Good luck to you in your future endeavours and we hope you win the title!